Annie
Leapin' Lizards! The irrepressible comic strip heroine takes center stage in one of the world's best-loved musicals.
Show Essentials
8
Roles
+ Ensemble
G
Rated
2
Acts

Full Synopsis

Act One

It is 3 a.m. on a chilly morning in early December 1933. Six orphans – Molly, Kate, Tessie, Pepper, July and Duffy – are asleep in the dormitory of the Girls' Annex of The New York City Municipal Orphanage. Molly, the youngest, wakes up from a dream and cries out for her mother. This wakes the other orphans, who begin arguing. Annie, age 11, runs in with a bucket. She has been cleaning; this is a punishment from Miss Hannigan, the villainous director of the orphanage. Annie comforts Molly, who begs her to read the note that Annie's parents left when they abandoned her. Pepper reminds the group that they also left Annie one-half of a silver locket and kept the other half, with a promise to reclaim her one day. Annie then pulls Molly close to her and sings a lullaby about the parents she imagines, but has never known ("Maybe").

Thinking about her parents inspires Annie to run away from the orphanage to search for them. She packs a bag and is ready to leave when Miss Hannigan discovers her. Miss Hannigan makes all the orphans get up to scrub floors and strip beds to pay for Annie's misbehavior. Their complaints that it is 4:00 in the morning fall on deaf ears. As they clean, the orphans complain about their difficult circumstances ("Hard-knock Life"). In the morning, when Bundles McCloskey, the laundry man, comes to make a pick-up, the orphans take advantage of the fact that Miss Hannigan is flirting with him and sneak Annie out of the building in a laundry bag. Realizing that Annie has escaped, Miss Hannigan calls for the police as the orphans celebrate ("Hard-knock Life – Reprise").

Annie now finds herself on a street that is lined with tenements. She encounters a mutt that is being chased by dogcatchers. She rescues him and tries to cheer him up by explaining her philosophy that, even if things aren't great today, they're bound to get better in the future ("Tomorrow"). When a policeman makes her prove that the mutt is her dog, she names him Sandy on the spot and then calls him to come to her. The dog miraculously responds, and they become a team.

Some time later, Annie comes upon a Hooverville, a Depression-style shantytown of jerry-built shacks, under a bridge on the East River. The residents of the makeshift town, who have lost their homes and their fortunes in the Great Depression, are cooking stew over an outdoor fire. They blame the former president, Herbert Hoover, for their plight ("Hooverville"). The group befriends Annie and Sandy. Annie tries to cheer them up, insisting that the future will be brighter. A policeman breaks up the crowd, driving the squatters away from their makeshift homes. Annie and Sandy run away.

Back at the orphanage, the girls torment Miss Hannigan, who expresses her disgust at being saddled with the small creatures ("Little Girls"). She has just settled down to enjoy a radio soap opera when a policeman returns Annie. As Miss Hannigan is threatening Annie, Grace Farrell, an attractive and well-dressed young woman, enters, carrying an attaché case. She is the private secretary of billionaire, Oliver Warbucks, who wants to invite an orphan to his mansion for Christmas. Grace is instantly drawn to Annie and she demands that Miss Hannigan sign the required papers as she escorts Annie to a waiting limousine. Miss Hannigan can't believe her rotten luck ("Little Girls – Reprise").

Grace brings Annie to Mr. Warbucks' mansion and introduces her to the servants. Annie is in awe of her new surroundings and she is made to feel completely welcome by the staff ("I Think I'm Gonna Like It Here"). Oliver Warbucks arrives. He is a powerful figure in the country and a pivotal player in the current economic crisis. He is taken aback by Annie's appearance in his house, as he had expected the orphan to be a boy and is puzzled by the prospect of dealing with a little girl. Almost immediately, though, he feels a deep connection to Annie's spunk and personality, which remind him of his own humble beginnings.

Contrary to his usual behavior, he decides to take a night off. Warbucks escorts Annie to see a movie at the Roxy, treating her to an ice cream soda and a hansom cab ride around Central Park. Grace joins them. As she tours New York, Annie sees the city in a new way ("N.Y.C.") At the end of the evening, Annie is exhausted, and Warbucks carries her home. As they leave Times Square, the faithful Sandy enters and forlornly wanders off in search of Annie.

Grace arrives at the orphanage to tell Miss Hannigan that Oliver Warbucks wants to adopt Annie. She leaves just as Miss Hannigan's brother, Rooster, arrives with his girlfriend, Lily. Rooster has come to borrow money from his sister, but, when Miss Hannigan refuses, he reminds her of their mother's lullaby ("Easy Street"). As they lament their own misfortunes, Miss Hannigan shares the news of Annie's pending adoption by Warbucks. Rooster is determined to use Annie's situation to their advantage.

Back at his estate, Warbucks is talking on the telephone to the President of the United States, Franklin D. Roosevelt. A package from Tiffany & Co. arrives, which contains a silver locket for Annie. Warbucks considers the ways in which adopting Annie will change his life ("Why Should I Change a Thing?")

When Annie comes downstairs, Warbucks tells her that he wants to adopt her and gives her the locket. Instead of the cheerful response that he imagined, Annie begins to weep. When he learns about her dream of finding her parents and the secret of the half-locket that she has treasured for so long, he sets his own feelings aside and orders an exhaustive search for Annie's parents ("You Won't Be an Orphan for Long"). Annie knows that she will find her parents soon ("Tomorrow – Reprise"). Warbucks laments his loss but is resolved to find her real parents.

Act Two

Annie and Warbucks are guests on Bert Healy's popular radio show. They make a plea for Annie's parents to return, and Warbucks offers $50,000 to anyone who can prove that they are her mother and father. The show closes with the radio actors performing a classic song and dance number ("You're Never Fully Dressed without a Smile"). The orphans are listening to Bert Healy's radio show and singing along ("You're Never Fully Dressed without a Smile – Children"). Miss Hannigan, furious about Annie's good fortune, sends them out of the room.

Rooster and Lily arrive, disguised as Ralph and Shirley Mudge, saying they are Annie's parents. They plan to claim Annie and the $50,000 reward, but they need Miss Hannigan's help. Once they have the money, they plan to do away with Annie and live in the lap of luxury ("Easy Street – Reprise").

Meanwhile, in Washington, D.C., President Roosevelt and members of his cabinet are listening to a popular radio commentator attack the President's policies. Warbucks and Annie arrive in the Oval Office. As Warbucks and the government officials discuss the depressing facts about the economic situation, Annie counters by reminding them to stay optimistic ("Tomorrow – Reprise"). The President reacts to her viewpoint with enthusiasm and makes the cabinet members sing along. When Warbucks and Annie hear the news that hundreds of people who are claiming to be Annie's parents are surrounding the Warbucks mansion, they immediately return to New York. Inspired by Annie's optimism, the cabinet members and the President invent the New Deal.


At the mansion, Annie and Warbucks discover that Grace has already interviewed and dismissed the throngs of people since no one mentioned anything about a locket. The maker of Annie's locket has also reported that the purchasers cannot be traced. It appears that Annie's quest cannot have a happy ending. Attempting to console her, Warbucks declares his own feelings about Annie and her importance in his life ("Something Was Missing").

Finally, Warbucks' plans to adopt Annie are set in motion, as are the preparations for the party to celebrate the adoption. Annie and Warbucks express their delight with the idea of becoming father and daughter ("I Don't Need Anything but You"). Everyone at the mansion becomes involved in the preparations for the festivities. As Supreme Court Justice Brandeis is about to finalize the adoption, Rooster and Lily, disguised as Ralph and Shirley Mudge, appear with the other half of Annie's locket. They also have Annie's birth certificate, which has been supplied by Miss Hannigan. They announce their intention to take Annie home to live with them in New Jersey on a pig farm. Warbucks convinces them to let Annie spend Christmas with him at the mansion. He says that the Mudges can pick her up the next day; they agree and leave. As Grace escorts Annie upstairs, she remembers having seen Mr. Mudge before. Warbucks calls President Roosevelt to ask a favor.


The next morning, Annie waits apprehensively for the Mudges to claim her. President Roosevelt arrives with the news that the FBI has analyzed the handwriting on the note that Annie's parents left behind, in an attempt to trace their identity. The investigation reveals that her real parents were named David and Margaret Bennett... and that they are dead; the Mudges are impostors. Annie and Warbucks declare their love for each other. They realize that only Miss Hannigan could have given the Mudges the locket and birth certificate.

Miss Hannigan arrives with the orphans to celebrate Christmas. As the Mudges arrive, another communication from the FBI reveals their true identities. Miss Hannigan tries to save herself by pretending to have no association with Rooster and Lily, but all three are hauled off to jail. Annie introduces the orphans to Warbucks and promises that they will have a much better life in the future ("A New Deal for Christmas"). A huge package arrives for Annie, and, when she opens it... Sandy jumps into her arms!

Casting

Casting

Cast Size: Flexible
Cast Type: Children
Dance Requirements: Standard

Character Breakdown

Annie
A street-wise orphan; she is eventually taken in by Oliver Warbucks. Spunky, friendly, big-voiced.
Gender: female
Age: 10 to 12
Vocal range top: G5
Vocal range bottom: A3
Warbucks
A successful businessman with a warm heart. Rich, stiff-collared, bullish.
Gender: male
Age: 40 to 55
Vocal range top: Gb5
Vocal range bottom: B3
Grace Farrell
Faithful secretary to Mr. Oliver Warbucks. Poised, sweet, gentle.
Gender: female
Age: 20 to 35
Vocal range top: G5
Vocal range bottom: Bb3
Orphans
The other girls in the orphanage with Annie. These girls are gritty, neglected and vulnerable, yet basically honest and potentially loveable. Includes Molly, Kate, Tessie, Pepper, July, and Duffy.
Gender: female
Age: 6 to 13
Servants
The servants at the Warbucks mansion. Includes Drake, Mrs. Pugh, Mrs. Greer, Cecille, and Annette.
Gender: both
Age: 20 to 50
Miss Hannigan
The orphanage matron who hates children but is fond of liquor. Very disillusioned, bitter, and cold.
Gender: female
Age: 30 to 45
Vocal range top: F5
Vocal range bottom: A3
Rooster
Miss Hannigan's no-good brother looking for a quick buck. A sleazy, slick con man.
Gender: male
Age: 25 to 35
Vocal range top: G5
Vocal range bottom: B3
Lily
Rooster's girlfriend, who is also out for a quick buck. She is considered to be a floozy and bimbo.
Gender: female
Age: 20 to 30
Vocal range top: G5
Vocal range bottom: B3
Bert Healy
The ultimate radio personality. He helps Annie by broadcasting about the search for her birth parents.
Gender: male
Age: 30 to 45
Vocal range top: G5
Vocal range bottom: E4
Roosevelt
The 32nd President of the United States. A Democrat and friend of Warbucks.
Gender: male
Age: 40 to 60
Vocal range top: F4
Vocal range bottom: Eb3
Ensemble
Servants (Drake, Mrs. Greer, Mrs. Pugh), Boylan Sisters, Cabinet Mambers, Hooverville Citizens
Gender: both
Full Song List
Overture
Maybe
Hard Knock Life
Hard Knock Life (Reprise)
Tomorrow
Hooverville
Little Girls
Little Girls (Reprise)
I Think I'm Gonna Like It Here
N.Y.C.
Easy Street
Why Should I Change a Thing?
You Won't Be An Orphan For Long
N.Y. Entr'acte
Fully Dressed

Show History

Inspiration

Annie is based on Harold Gray's popular comic strip, Little Orphan Annie. The comic strip premiered in the 1920s in the New York Daily News, and became one of the most widely read strips in the 30s and 40s. Lyricist-director, Martin Charnin, received a book of Little Orphan Annie strips for Christmas in 1971 and started to imagine a musical comedy based on the lead character.

Charnin campaigned the idea to colleagues, Charles Strouse, a two-time Tony-winning composer, and Thomas Meehan, a short story writer for The New Yorker magazine, and they soon jumped into the project. Although the show was only written in fourteen months, it took nearly four years to get on Broadway due to a lack of interest from producers.

Productions

Annie had its world premiere on August 10, 1976, at the Goodspeed Opera House in East Haddam, Connecticut. Kristen Vigard was the first actress to play the title role, but the producers soon decided that Vigard's genuinely sweet interpretation was not tough enough for the street-smart orphan. After a week of performances, Vigard was replaced by Andrea McArdle.

The production moved to the Kennedy Center in Washington and later opened on Broadway to immense success. On April 21, 1977, the original Broadway production opened at the Alvin Theatre – now the Neil Simon Theatre – and starred Andrea McArdle as Annie, Reid Shelton as Daddy Warbucks and Dorothy Loudon as Miss Hannigan. Produced by illustrious film director, Mike Nichols, the original production closed on January 2, 1983, after an astonishing 2,377 performances, making it the third-longest running musical of the 1970s. Annie spawned four different national tours and dozens of international productions during its Broadway run.

The original West End production of Annie premiered at the Victoria Palace Theatre on May 3, 1978. The show closed on November 28, 1981, after 1,485 performances. A twentieth anniversary Broadway revival played the Al Hirschfeld Theatre in 1997; a highly publicized contest to find a new Annie was sponsored by the department store, Macy's. The revival closed on October 19, 1997, after 14 previews and 239 performances.

The most recent Broadway revival, which originally featured Lilla Crawford as Annie, began previews on October 3, 2012, and, as of July 2013, had been performed over 300 times. 

Cultural Influence

  • Annie was made into an Oscar-nominated feature film in 1982, starring Albert Finney, Carol Burnett, Bernadette Peters and Tim Curry.
  • In 1999, Annie was remade into a TV movie, starring Victor Garber, Kathy Bates, Kristin Chenoweth and Alan Cumming.
  • Rapper, Jay-Z, reworked the classic song, "Hard-knock Life," into a single titled "Hard-knock Life (Ghetto Anthem)" for his third album, "Vol. 2: Hard Knock Life."

Trivia

  • Annie currently ranks number 25 on the list of longest-running Broadway shows.
  • Before Sarah Jessica Parker rose to fame as a television and film actress, she appeared in the role of Annie on Broadway.
  • Add Sutton Foster to the list of famous former orphans! The Tony Award-winning actress made her stage debut at the age of ten as the endearing and enduring ragamuffin in Augusta, GA.

  • Written in only fourteen months, Annie's journey to Broadway took four and a half years, and went on to play 2,377 performances on Broadway in its original run, picking up seven Tony Awards in the process.

Critical Reaction

"An intensely likable musical! ...It has a rare kind of gutsy charm"
– The New York Times



"Spectacular on every count.... A sudden reversion to the concept of fun."
– Newsweek

"At the heart of musical comedy; big warm-hearted, funny and overflowing!"
– New York Post

Drama Desk Award

1977 - Outstanding Book, Winner (Thomas Meehan)
1977 - Outstanding Direction of a Musical, Winner (Martin Charnin)
1977 - Outstanding Choreography, Winner (Peter Gannaro)
1977 - Outstanding Choreography, Winner (Peter Gennaro)
1977 - Outstanding Costume Design, Winner (Theoni V. Aldredge)
1977 - Outstanding Costume Design, Winner (Theoni V. Aldredge)
1977 - Outstanding Director Of A Musical, Winner (Martin Charnin)
1977 - Outstanding Direction of a Musical, Winner (Martin Charnin)
1977 - Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical, Winner (Dorothy Loudon)
1977 - Outstanding Musical, Winner (Annie)
1977 - Outstanding Lyrics, Winner (Martin Charnin)
1977 - Outstanding Lyrics, Winner (Martin Charnin)
1977 - Outstanding Music, Nominee (Charles Strouse)
1977 - Outstanding Music, Nominee (Charles Strouse)
1977 - Outstanding Musical, Winner ()
1977 - Outstanding Music, Nominee (Charles Strouse)
1977 - Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical, Winner (Dorothy Loudon)
1977 - Outstanding Actor in a Musical, Nominee (Reid Shelton)
1977 - Outstanding Actor in a Play, Nominee (Reid Shelton)
1977 - Outstanding Book of a Musical, Winner (Thomas Meehan)

Tony® Award

1977 - Best Score, Winner (Charles Strouse (music), Martin Charnin (lyrics))
1977 - Best Actress in a Musical, Winner (Dorothy Loudon)
1977 - Book Of A Broadway Musical, Winner (Thomas Meehan)
1977 - Best Actress in a Musical, Nominee (Andrea McArdle)
1977 - Broadway Musical, Winner (Lewis Allen, Mike Nichols, Irwin Meyer, Stephen R. Friedman (producers))
1977 - Best Scenic Design, Winner (David Mitchell)
1977 - Choreographer, Winner (Peter Gennaro)
1977 - Best Costume Design, Winner (Theoni V. Aldredge)
1977 - Costume Designer (Play), Winner (Theoni V. Aldredge)
1977 - Best Choreography, Winner (Peter Gennaro)
1977 - Director Of A Broadway Musical, Nominee (Martin Charnin)
1977 - Best Direction Of A Musical, Nominee (Martin Charnin)
1977 - Scenic Designer (Play), Winner (David Mitchell)
1977 - Best Actor in a Musical, Nominee (Reid Shelton)
1977 - Actor (Musical), Nominee (Reid Shelton)
1977 - Best Musical, Winner (Annie)
1977 - Actress (Musical), Nominee (Andrea McArdle)
1977 - Best Book Of A Musical, Winner (Thomas Meehan)
1977 - Actress (Musical), Winner (Dorothy Loudon)
1997 - Best Revival Of A Musical, Nominee (Annie)
1997 - Musical Revival, Nominee (Timothy Childs, Rodger Hess, Jujamcyn Theaters, Terri B. Childs, Al Nocciolino (producers))
1997 - Best Original Score, Winner (Music by Charles Strouse; Lyrics by Martin Charnin)

Theatre World Award

1977 - Best Debut Performance, Winner (Andrea McArdle)

NY Drama Critics Circle Award

1977 - Best Musical, Winner (Annie)

Grammy Award

1977 - Outstanding Cast Show Album, Winner (Annie)

Outer Critics Circle Award

1977 - Best Actress in a Musical, Winner (Dorothy Loudon)

Connect

Billing

Based on Little Orphan Annie by permission of The Media Tribune Services, Inc.

Requirements

You must give the authors/creators billing credits, as specified in the Production Contract, in a conspicuous manner on the first page of credits in all programs and on houseboards, displays and in all other advertising announcements of any kind.
Percentages listed indicate required type size in relation to title size.
Annie
(100%)
 
Book by
THOMAS MEEHAN

(50%)

 
Music by
CHARLES STROUSE

(50%)

Lyrics by
MARTIN CHARNIN

(50%)

Original Broadway Production Directed by
MARTIN CHARNIN

(50%)

 
Based on “Little Orphan Annie”®
By Permission of Tribune Content Agency, LLC

(50%)

 
The names of the Bookwriter, Composer and Lyricist shall be equal in size, type, coloring boldness and prominence.   No billing shall appear in type larger or more prominent than the billing to the Authors except for the title of the Play.
The following billing to Goodspeed Opera House shall appear at the end of the billing credits on the title page of all Playbills and programs and wherever a subsequent producer receives credit.
Originally Produced at The Goodspeed Opera House, Michael P. Price, Executive Director
 
In addition, the following credit shall be accorded on the title page of all programs:
Presented on Broadway by Mike Nichols
 
Produced by
Irwin Meyer            Stephen R. Friedman             Lewis Allen

Alvin Nederlander          The John F. Kennedy Center for the           Icarus
Associates Inc.                       Performing Arts                                   Productions

 
In advertisements of 1/4 page size or less or where only the title of the play, performance dates and venue are provided, the following "shortened billing" is permissible:
ANNIE
The videotaping or other video or audio recording of this production is strictly prohibited

Included Materials

ItemQuantity Included
LIBRETTO/VOCAL BOOK25
PIANO CONDUCTOR'S SCORE2
STUDY GUIDE1

Production Resources

Resource
CUSTOMIZABLE SHOW POSTERS
FULL SCORE VOL. 1 OF 4
FULL SCORE VOL. 2 OF 4
FULL SCORE VOL. 3 OF 4
FULL SCORE VOL. 4 OF 4
KEYBOARD PATCH SOLUTIONS
LOGO PACK
LOGO TEES SIX-PACK ADULT LARGE
LOGO TEES SIX-PACK ADULT MEDIUM
LOGO TEES SIX-PACK ADULT SMALL
LOGO TEES SIX-PACK ADULT X-LARGE
LOGO TEES SIX-PACK ADULT XX-LARGE
LOGO TEES SIX-PACK CHILD LARGE
LOGO TEES SIX-PACK CHILD MEDIUM
LOGO TEES SIX-PACK CHILD SMALL
ORCHEXTRA
PRODUCTION SLIDES
REFERENCE RECORDING
REHEARSCORE+
SCENE PARTNER
STAGE MANAGER SCRIPT
TRANSPOSITIONS-ON-DEMAND
VIRTUAL STAGE MANAGER

STANDARD ORCHESTRATION

InstrumentationDoubling
BASS
CELLO
DRUMS
GUITAR
KEYBOARD 2
PERCUSSIONBELLS , CABASA , RATCHET , SIREN , SLAPSTICK , SLEIGH BELLS , TEMPLE BLOCK , TIMPANI , TRIANGLE , WHIP , XYLOPHONE
REED 1ALTO SAXOPHONE , CLARINET , FLUTE , PICCOLO , SOPRANO SAX
REED 2ALTO SAXOPHONE , BARITONE SAXOPHONE , CLARINET , FLUTE
REED 3BASS CLARINET , CLARINET , TENOR SAXOPHONE
REED 4CLARINET , FLUTE , PICCOLO
REED 5CLARINET , FLUTE
TROMBONE
TROMBONE 2
TRUMPET
TUBA
VIOLIN