Casting

Casting

Cast Size: Flexible
Cast Type: Children
Dance Requirements: Standard

Character Breakdown

Seven Narrators
The Seven Narrators - Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Indigo, Violet - introduce us to the Hundred Acre Wood and help tell our story. These non-singing roles are perfect for your strong actors who can speak clearly and make good eye contact with the audience.
Gender: both
Winnie The Pooh
Winnie the Pooh is a bear with very little brain. His good heart and love of honey will capture your audience's hearts as he helps his friends find Christopher Robin. Cast a performer who is a strong singer, as Pooh has several solo lines.
Gender: male
Pooh's Tummy
Pooh's Tummy is the endearing - but very hungry - part of Pooh! This role can be one or more performers who are onstage, offstage or any way that fits your production. The Tummy does not have any spoken lines and may be a great role for performers new to theater. While not necessary, you may want to find performers who are shorter than your actor playing Pooh.
Gender: both
Tigger
Tigger is a tiger and a bundle of energy. He is fiercely loyal, never stops bouncing and is always up for an adventure. Cast a student who can bring a big personality and a lot of excitement to the role. While a good singer will have a fun time with Tigger's song, it is most important that the personality of this character comes through.
Gender: male
Piglet
Piglet is a shy and quiet pig. He is often afraid of his own shadow but is also incredibly smart and noble and a great problem solver. Cast a performer who can portray the timid side of Piglet while projecting his or her voice - and personality - to the audience. Piglet's solo lines are perfect for a singer with a sweet voice.
Gender: both
Rabbit
Rabbit is a worrisome rabbit who means the best for his friends but is not always sure how to help. The actor playing this role should be able to find variety in the ways to portray Rabbit's nervousness. Rabbit primarily sings as part of the ensemble with only one solo singing line, so cast a strong actor in this role.
Gender: both
Owl
Owl is a well-educated, slightly pompous owl. He is quick to explain or lecture, even when he isn't sure of the right answer. Still, the other animals look up to Owl and come to him when Christopher Robin has gone missing. Owl's solos in "The Backson Song" are some of the most challenging in the show but can be spoken if necessary. Cast an actor with a good sense of rhythm and pitch in this role.
Gender: both
Kanga
Kanga is a gentle kangaroo and mother to Roo. She is good-natured and always ready to take care of the other animals. This role has one solo singing line and is perfect for a performer with a lot of heart. Consider casting a performer who is taller than the actor playing Roo.
Gender: female
Roo
Roo is a kangaroo and the youngest animal in the wood. He is boisterous and playful and always looks up to his friend Tigger. This is a great role for a student new to theater. You may want to audition Kanga and Roo at the same time, since they will always be together onstage.
Gender: both
Eeyore
Eeyore is a gloomy but loyal donkey. He can never seem to shake his bad luck and is constantly losing his tail. Despite his gloomy attitude, he always wants the best for his friends. While Eeyore has one solo singing line, this is primarily an acting role that requires a disciplined actor with good diction. Eeyore's lines are a treat for the audience, and can lead to a case of the giggles.
Gender: both
Bees
The Bees are a flashy, energetic group who ultimately help Pooh get his honey. They pop in and out through the story and can be a ton of fun for the performers. The more bees you have, the more volume you'll get in the Honey songs, so cast as many as you can handle!
Gender: both
Christopher Robin

Christopher Robin is a kind boy who plays with his animal friends in the Hundred Acre Wood and leads by example. While his disappearance creates the scare of the Backson, his return sets everything right again. This non-singing role is a wonderful opportunity for an actor who can deliver spoken lines loudly and clearly.

Word Chorus
The Word Chorus sings "Halfway Down" and helps all of the animals out of the Backson pit. This group is great for your strong choral singers. If you do not have enough performers to support this number, the Narrators and the Animal Chorus can double as the Word Chorus.
Animal Chorus
The Animal Chorus is the ensemble of animals in the Hundred Acre Wood, including Squirrels, Frogs, Beetles, Gophers, Chipmunks, Birds, Raccoons and any other animals you want to add! For added fun and ownership, you can let the students of the Animal Chorus decide which animals they want to be. This ensemble sings in almost every song and is critical to the storytelling.
Gender: both