Lauren Epsenhart

Lauren Epsenhart

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August 18, 2009
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Expanding your School Cast
Finding the right cast is difficult. Finding a large cast is even more difficult. Too often, there are not enough kids interested in audtioning for school shows. What to do? Her eare few suggestions to get the ball rolling... Part I: Spread the wordAdvertise, Advertise, Advertise. I know this is an obvious sugggestion but there are multiple resources, free resources, available that educators might not be taking advantage of (or aware of for that matter.) Ask teachers from all departments to make announcments in class or hang up posters. Hang posters in bathrooms, on the school bus, the cafateria, the school paper/morning announcmetns, or anyother unsual places students may not be expecting. This is a great way to introduce students to the marketing aspects of theatre. They can pass out flyers, lollipops, chocolate, buttons-all advertising for auditions and productions. Reach out to paretns through e-mails, letters, telephone, informing them of upcoming audtion dates and times. This is a way to get the community invloved as well. Put out announcments in local penny-savers or newspapers. ask local bussinesses if you can post auditon flyers or cards with information. Let's not forget Facebook, Myspace, Twitter, and MTI Showspace!
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June 30, 2009
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The death of Theatre Education in the public school system
Theatre Art Education programs have been severly cut in public school systems throughout the country. Theatre arts education reaches a diverse group of students, some of which might not excel in a traditonal classroom enviornment but shine once given a mic and a song. For some children, it's a form of expression, for others, a kind of therapy. It's been statistically proven that most children perform better in a classroom when continually participating in regular theatre art education program. Many schools in NYC, in conjuction with MTI, have been trying to keep the arts alive in schools city wide, with great success. Now I ask this; what can be done on at national level? I feel teachers, administrators, parents, siblilings, communities as a whole, should try, and be able, to keep theatre art education alive in the public school system. Money is an issue for most, which is why these programs have been cut in the first place, but, if we all put our heads together, I know there must be a solution or a way to get the ball rolling. Any suggestions?
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